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20120930
20121008
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KQED (PBS) 18
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English 18
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama questioned whether the real mitt romney was at last night's debate-- a criticism romney's spokesman dismissed as damage control. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on the candidates' appearances today, as they reprised last night's messages about jobs and the economy. >> brown: plus, we have our own debate on the differing approaches to taxes and deficit reduction. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the war in syria, as skirmishes spill over the border with turkey for a second day in a row. >> brown: we come back to last night's debate with two takes on how it was received. ray suarez talked to voters in the swing state of florida. >> i didn't hear what i need to about jobs. that is the number one interest of generally everyone in the united states. >> woodruff: and in our regular "daily download" segment, margaret warner explores how the face off played in social media. >> brown: and it hasn't happened in baseball in 45 years. we
on the battle for north carolina. jeffrey brown reports on the tightening presidential contest. >> brown: barack obama won this state in 2008 by the slimmest of margins with help from a large african-american turnout. four years later in a down economy it looks like his challenge will be even greater. >> woodruff: and we talk with national public radio's greg allen. he focuses on the outreach to hispanics in the tar heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close with snapshots of three of this year's macarthur genius award winners, each with a unique view of war. >> people tend to look at the military, they tend to look at war and they tend to look at conflict as something very black and white. it's not like that at all. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: creating new enriching experiences. through intel's philos
to smoky cabins and labor woes, we get the latest on troubles at american airlines. >> ifill: jeffrey brown updates the story of the butler accused of stealing documents from the pope and leaking them to the press. >> woodruff: hari sreenivasan travels to the electorally important swing state of iowa where the polls opened last week. >> a recent des moines register poll found less than 2% of iowa voters were undecided, which means the campaigns could benefit from locking in votes early. >> ifill: margaret warner examines a genetic breakthrough that could allow doctors to diagnose and treat seriously ill infants sooner. >> woodruff: and we close by returning to a conversation with tonight's debate moderator, our own jim lehrer about his book on past presidential debates. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> w
. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, marcia coyle of the "national law journal" walks us through a term that will tackle affirmative action, and may decide disputes over same-sex marriage and civil rights law. >> woodruff: then we turn to the presidential campaign and the analysis of stuart rothenberg and susan page as the candidates fine tune their messages days before the first debate. >> brown: we zero in on one issue confronting the candidates. hari sreenivasan reports on the safety net program known as medicaid. >> anyone of us at an advanced age really is just one fall away from a broken hip that could end you up in a nursing home. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with author hedrick smith. his new book explores the dismantling of the american dream for the middle class. >> brown: and we look at oppression and empowerment for women around the world, with journalists and filmmakers nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. >> once you give a woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonig
criticized the administration for not creating enough jobs. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, what do the numbers tell us about the true state of the labor market? we get an assessment. >> woodruff: then, gwen ifill reports on missouri's senate contest where the democratic incumbent has unexpectedly grabbed the lead. >> this the united states senate. mark shields an david brooks >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> woodruff: and ray suarez previews another political match to watch, thousands of miles south in venezuela, where long- time leader hugo chavez faces a young challenger. >> the election marks a watershed moment for the world's second largest oil producing nation. and a critical supplier of crude oil to the u.s. its number one customer. >> woodruff: that'all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: carnegie corp >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for publi
for the control of the u.s. house? governor brown vetoes few of the more than 1,800 bills on his desk, as he presses for support of proposition 30 on the november ballot. and gas jumped as much as 20 cents overnight, with the spike expected to continue. plus, anti-domestic violence leader estra sola on making all violence an issue of global concern, coming up next. >>> good evening, i'm belva davis and welcome to "this week in northern california." on our news panel tonight, dan walters, political column nis for "the sacramento bee." in studio, we have tom vacar, computer editor for ktvu news and josh richman, regional political reporter for the bay asia news group. and joe garofoli, political reporter for "the san francisco chronicle." joe, you were in denver for the first presidential debate. must have been hard covering it, since there were so many people tweeting that night. tell us what's happened since then. how are the candidates -- >> things have really evolved over the last 40 ho8 hours. it was widely perceived that the president did not have a good night. didn't really realize the
. >> oh, my god. brown hair. i still remember his brown hair. >> what has this country, what does this culture look like to a kid coming from mexico? >> it was a wonderful opportunity because this country gave me the opportunities that my country of origin couldn't give me. i was censored in mexico when i was 23 and 24. >> as a reporter? >> as a reporter. it was the usual thing in mexico. the government would say what you could say on the air and what you couldn't say on the air. i decided i didn't want to be that kind of reporter so i sold everything and came to the united states. just imagine that now i can talk to anyone without asking permission for anything. i had to leave my country because of that. it used to be said that the powerful and the rich never leave their country, only those who need possibilities and those who are poor and those who are ambitious leave their countries. that's exactly what happened with me. i came here because i had to come here. something pushed me out of mexico and something pulled me from the united states. now i have two passports, but honestl
,000 people find work. baltimore resident michelle brown wants to be included in this year's number. she's been taking job readiness classes at a local goodwill center as part of a welfare-to- work program. >> we learn how to do our resume, we learn how to act on interviews, we learn how to ask questions to certain employers, we learn how to do cover letters, we learn how to just basically find a job the right way. >> reporter: she's joining millions of people who have sought services from goodwill. since the recession began, goodwill has seen a flood of people seeking job training services. they come from a wide range of backgrounds, from people with disabilities, to those who have been incarcerated, to people who just need a few extra skills to find work. instructor kevin beasley says in the down economy, his students need more preparation than ever to get through tough recruiting processes. >> in the past, even for myself, i know i remember interviews where it was real basic. why are you the best one for the job? and that was it. ok, you know, you can start on monday. but now, because
in the cab met together under gordon brown, and in the end it is better to just let people state their views and say what they want and a party can decide, and that is what has happened. i think it is important obviously that he has the freedom to lead the party as he wants, and that is why i say, you said i am not on the front line. i put it i am not on the front bench but the front line at the grass roots. >> in the battle of ideas. >> yes, i think that is important. >> so when you look at the government in power, the tori government of david cameron, how are they doing? >> well, the buying test, is an economic test, and by their own light they are failing it, britain is in double dip recession. >> too much austerity. >> yes, basically we are in a balance sheet recession. the private sector is deleveraging hard, export markets are really pretty slack, and for government to withdraw support from the economy as the tories have done since 2010 has really been a recipe for a double dip recession and sure enough we have got one. >> you actually have got an interesting case study, america is a m
people outside the state. he ran a very down-home campaign. >> this is my lunch. i pack a brown bag each day so i can save some money to spend on the more important things in life like sending my kids to college. >> nichols says that despite the folksy image, in the years leading up to walker's 2010 campaign, he had become a master political fundraiser. >> and he began to forge incredibly close ties with a lot of corporate interests that he had first been introduced to in alec, individuals and groups like the koch brothers. >> david and charles koch, the billionaire businessmen behind a vast industrial empire are also political activists with an agenda. their companies and foundations have been alec members and funders for years. >> the koch brothers were among the two or three largest contributors to scott walker's campaign for governor of wisconsin. and the koch brothers get that if you really want to influence the politics of this country, you don't just give money to presidential campaigns. you don't just give money to congressional campaign committees. the smart ones, the smart play
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)